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Veridian homes - worth it or not?

What are the things that puzzle, enrage, delight and tickle you as you go about your life in Madison?

Re: Veridian homes - worth it or not?

Postby TheBookPolice » Sun Aug 02, 2009 10:50 pm

There are Veridian homes almost completed that you could still customize with upgrades. There are vacant finished homes that have never been occupied. And there are a load of barely-occupied homes in the 2-6 year old range that are also for sale.

I see Veridian with the same reputation as Food Fight restaurants. There are some valid beefs, but a lot of irrational hatred. And I mean hatred.

But I have to agree: contracting to begin the building process now seems superfluous, especially with Veridian since they map out their floorplans so completely. It's not like you'll be drawing up the footprint yourself.

I'm curious if they can be negotiated with on pricing, or if the market has rebounded enough that they're back to holding a firm line on their list prices for new homes.
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Re: Veridian homes - worth it or not?

Postby ckc » Thu Mar 24, 2011 10:02 pm

Let revival homes or someone else price the same home. you will be very suprised. You pay alot of money towards overhead and marketing, not your home. Also try to sell your veridian home and see what happens.
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Re: Veridian homes - worth it or not?

Postby WestSideYuppie » Tue Mar 29, 2011 11:43 pm

Bellwether wrote:
snoqueen wrote:The thing about being able to cut through an exterior wall with a utility knife has been around for years. In reality, a certain amount of structural sheathing is necessary to resist forces that would throw the whole house out of plumb, and is therefore required by codes. If someone's going to break into your new house, they probably aren't coming through a hole they cut in the wall with a utility knife.


Sno's right on this -- been around a long, long time. Used to own a house in Fitchburg, built about 15 years ago by Kegonsa Builders. It wasn't sheathed with plywood or pressboard on the long walls -- just at the corners, to keep it true, and above/below windows/doors. Friends of ours remodeled the basement of their then-one-year-old Princeton home (this was 4 years ago) and were shocked to find no "board" between the siding and the drywall, just moisture barrier and insulation, along the long walls. It's common, and it's not just Veridian.


A contractor working on my house told me the same story about the utility knife thing, and said that the building code allows an alternative to exterior OSB, such as some sort of cross braces. I don't remember the details, as it was just small talk.
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Re: Veridian homes - worth it or not?

Postby Mean Scenester » Tue Apr 05, 2011 8:26 am

Bellwether wrote:Friends of ours remodeled the basement of their then-one-year-old Princeton home (this was 4 years ago) and were shocked to find no "board" between the siding and the drywall, just moisture barrier and insulation, along the long walls. It's common, and it's not just Veridian.

Had a respected home inspector tell me that wrapping these new homes in Tyvek (i.e. "moisture barrier") is a recipe for a black mold disaster within ten years.
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Re: Veridian homes - worth it or not?

Postby narcoleptish » Tue Apr 05, 2011 11:01 am

Yeah, I could see that. Zero air flow means very little chance for any accumulated moisture to dry out. You want your home to breath a little, especially when a tornado drops the outside pressure way below the pressure in your house.
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Re: Veridian homes - worth it or not?

Postby kissyfish » Tue Apr 05, 2011 11:11 am

Damn, I just put tyvek in my remodeeled attic (behind the denim insulation), and when my house was just resided they wrapped it in tyvek.

I am going to be really pissed off if I get a mold problem. My house is old and the windows dont seal very well, so maybe that will mitigate it.

Wont tyvek be in for one hell of a class action lawsuit if this proves true? EVERY construction job I have seen of late is using that stuff on every surface.
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Re: Veridian homes - worth it or not?

Postby snoqueen » Tue Apr 05, 2011 12:23 pm

In an attic you're supposed to have roof, wall, or soffit ventilation every so-many feet to prevent moisture buildup. I found the following at
http://www.ornl.gov/sci/roofs+walls/ins ... ns_05.html

It is important that the house design, and construction, minimize the transfer of moisture from the living space to the attic. To handle any moisture that does migrate into the attic, traditional attic design calls for ventilation. Attics may be ventilated with a combination of soffit vents at eaves and continuous ridge vents. Attic vents may also be installed in gable faces. Many codes and standards require one square foot of unobstructed ventilation opening for each 300 square feet of attic floor area if a vapor retarder is included in the ceiling separating the attic from the living space. Twice as much ventilation is recommended if there is no vapor retarder.


That doesn't speak to insulation added after construction, but if the new insulation (or vapor barrier) blocks ventilation (whether vents or plain old leaks) you may create a moisture problem you didn't have before. Madison doesn't require inspection for retrofit insulation, so I can't point you to a code section for guidance. Why not select a few surfaces where outside cold meets inside moisture and check every few months to see if a problem is developing?

Codes here do require roof vents under certain conditions (you can see them from the outside, and they're sometimes added when you re-roof your house). If you are having ventilation problems, those may be the easiest fix in an unfinished attic.
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Re: Veridian homes - worth it or not?

Postby kissyfish » Tue Apr 05, 2011 3:21 pm

snoqueen wrote:In an attic you're supposed to have roof, wall, or soffit ventilation every so-many feet to prevent moisture buildup. I found the following at
http://www.ornl.gov/sci/roofs+walls/ins ... ns_05.html

It is important that the house design, and construction, minimize the transfer of moisture from the living space to the attic. To handle any moisture that does migrate into the attic, traditional attic design calls for ventilation. Attics may be ventilated with a combination of soffit vents at eaves and continuous ridge vents. Attic vents may also be installed in gable faces. Many codes and standards require one square foot of unobstructed ventilation opening for each 300 square feet of attic floor area if a vapor retarder is included in the ceiling separating the attic from the living space. Twice as much ventilation is recommended if there is no vapor retarder.


That doesn't speak to insulation added after construction, but if the new insulation (or vapor barrier) blocks ventilation (whether vents or plain old leaks) you may create a moisture problem you didn't have before. Madison doesn't require inspection for retrofit insulation, so I can't point you to a code section for guidance. Why not select a few surfaces where outside cold meets inside moisture and check every few months to see if a problem is developing?

Codes here do require roof vents under certain conditions (you can see them from the outside, and they're sometimes added when you re-roof your house). If you are having ventilation problems, those may be the easiest fix in an unfinished attic.


I looked up the best practices and if I am not mistaken, I put up the little troughs for ventilation to the outside, then insulation, then tyvek, then drywall, and I tried to be overly generous on the ventilation part.

I will add this to my list of things to fret over.
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Re: Veridian homes - worth it or not?

Postby c02 » Fri Apr 08, 2011 1:36 pm

Have a Veridian home and have horrible mold in the master bath as well as mold on windows in the master suite. The fan, pardon the pun, sucks. The home is less than 6 years old. That is really our only issue but it's a big one nonetheless.

Couldn't agree more about Bruce company as mentioned earlier. Our landscaping / seeding was terrible. Nothing but weeds and very little grass into the second year. About half of the bushes they planted have since been yanked because they simply weren't growing and / or died within 3 years. I would use Veridian again, I would refuse Bruce Co. being a part of the process.
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Re: Veridian homes - worth it or not?

Postby rabble » Fri Apr 08, 2011 2:57 pm

c02 wrote:Have a Veridian home and have horrible mold in the master bath as well as mold on windows in the master suite. The fan, pardon the pun, sucks. The home is less than 6 years old. That is really our only issue but it's a big one nonetheless.

I don't know a lot about Veridian, but I keep running across that particular problem with friends who've bought newer houses. It's always the bathroom. It's all built as cheap as they can do it, and the first place that shows up is in the bath where the regs only deal with electricity and structural integrity.

To my way of thinking, if the bathroom and the landscaping are the worst things you're dealing with, Veridian isn't really all that different from any other mass-produced housing manufacturer.
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Re: Veridian homes - worth it or not?

Postby snoqueen » Sat Apr 09, 2011 11:38 am

They're trying to have as few air leaks as possible -- that's what all the Tyvek is about. The idea is energy efficiency. Unfortunately, an unintended result is so little air circulation and so few air changes per hour you get mold.

All this energy-saving stuff is a work in progress. It's not just Veridian.

There actually is a requirement for a ventilation fan (that exhausts to the outdoors) in every bathroom. Either they don't do the trick, or people forget to turn them on. For now, I'll settle for a slightly leaky old house with a clean bathroom.
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Re: Veridian homes - worth it or not?

Postby rabble » Sat Apr 09, 2011 5:04 pm

snoqueen wrote:There actually is a requirement for a ventilation fan (that exhausts to the outdoors) in every bathroom. Either they don't do the trick, or people forget to turn them on. For now, I'll settle for a slightly leaky old house with a clean bathroom.

You're right, and I should have mentioned it. The problem is that the minimum code for air movement is way below what it oughta be. When we did our bath - our 1935 house didn't have a fan and it was bad in there - the Re-bath guy said get the biggest fan you can find. Don't pay any attention to the specs about size of bath, just move the most air you can move. We got a fan that's supposed to vent a bathroom three times the size and we're glad. I think the wimpy fan is causing most of the problem for c02. That and they probably used lower grade bathroom sheetrock for the walls. We spent the most money on the stuff you can't see.
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Re: Veridian homes - worth it or not?

Postby c02 » Mon Apr 11, 2011 3:14 pm

rabble wrote:I think the wimpy fan is causing most of the problem for c02. That and they probably used lower grade bathroom sheetrock for the walls. We spent the most money on the stuff you can't see.


I don't know about materials used for the walls but I would concur with the fan. The fan goes on anytime the light goes on and currently I have it set to turn off ~45' after the switch is turned off. It would seem plenty of time for an appropriate fan to do its job.
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Re: Veridian homes - worth it or not?

Postby jman111 » Mon Apr 11, 2011 3:26 pm

I understand the risk of mold in insufficiently-ventilated bathrooms (where moisture is consistently produced); however, I question the presence of mold elsewhere in recently-constructed homes. It seems to me, this is a consequence of not effectively managing whole-house moisture levels (i.e not running dehumidifiers and/or ACs in summer).
I don't see the vapor barrier (Tyvek wrap) being a big issue. But that could be just me.
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Re: Veridian homes - worth it or not?

Postby c02 » Mon Apr 11, 2011 5:41 pm

We have it in the master bedroom around the sills only. I attribute it to the fact that it's directly connected to the master bath and when that door is open, the excess moisture ventures into the bedroom.

Of course, I know nothing of home construction so it's all an assumption on my part. We run a dehumidifier year-round and as much as I love heat, the boss has me put the AC on all summer.
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